• RT @JamesFransham: Last week Lewis Hamilton equalled Michael Schumacher's record of 91 Formula 1 GP victories. But who is the best driver t…
    The Economist Data Team Wed 21 Oct 2020 13:16
  • RT @gelliottmorris: In our Senate forecast today, Iowa has moved north of the 65% threshold into the Likely Democratic column, while Kansas…
    The Economist Data Team Sun 18 Oct 2020 22:58
  • RT @_rospearce: The expansion of 3G coverage since 2007. According to a new study, people’s confidence in their leaders declined after get…
    The Economist Data Team Fri 09 Oct 2020 09:09
  • RT @gelliottmorris: Biden is posting his best numbers in over a month in our forecast today -- Trump is dropping (and sick with coronavirus…
    The Economist Data Team Tue 06 Oct 2020 09:11
  • RT @AlexSelbyB: A good time to re-up this 2016 piece by @wade_zhou. Come for the Reinhart-Rogoff formula fiasco and stay for the battle bet…
    The Economist Data Team Mon 05 Oct 2020 12:55
  • RT @martgnz: We have added a new section to the US 2020 forecast with more data about each state. Compare: - Projected vote margin for 202…
    The Economist Data Team Wed 30 Sep 2020 15:46
  • RT @gelliottmorris: There's a fab new table on our forecast page today It shows each state's projected margin & uncertainty, as well as th…
    The Economist Data Team Wed 30 Sep 2020 15:46
  • RT @JamesFransham: Covid-19 has now claimed 1,000,000 lives around the globe. But the true toll is likely to be much higher. (Fast thread,…
    The Economist Data Team Tue 29 Sep 2020 16:55
  • RT @AlexSelbyB: On the surface this second wave looks a lot like the first, but less testing at the start of the pandemic meant millions of…
    The Economist Data Team Tue 29 Sep 2020 12:29
  • RT @TheEconomist: We have launched our forecasting models for America’s Senate and House races in November. A thread ? (1/10) https://t.co/…
    The Economist Data Team Fri 25 Sep 2020 21:01
  • RT @JamesFransham: Our cover this week looks at policymakers' failure to deal with covid-19. Cases are rising sharply in much of Europe and…
    The Economist Data Team Fri 25 Sep 2020 18:46
  • RT @martgnz: This week's briefing on covid-19 couldn't have been done without a huge amount of data reporting and statistical modelling. Lo…
    The Economist Data Team Fri 25 Sep 2020 11:26
  • RT @gelliottmorris: Our Senate forecast is now live! We give Democrats a 2-in-3 (67%) chance of winning control of the chamber. https://t…
    The Economist Data Team Wed 23 Sep 2020 12:19
  • RT @TheEconomist: After months of work navigating untold piles of data, @DanRosenheck reveals our statistical model of America’s Senate rac…
    The Economist Data Team Wed 23 Sep 2020 12:09
  • RT @martgnz: Our US 2020 Senate and House forecasts are live Senate - Democrats 67% (47-56 seats) - Republicans 33% (44-53 seats) House -…
    The Economist Data Team Wed 23 Sep 2020 10:49
  • RT @_rospearce: The shifting ideology of United States' Supreme Court justices #ddj Link https://t.co/NnR3qef8xE
    The Economist Data Team Tue 22 Sep 2020 11:43

    RUTH BADER GINSBURG, the trailblazing liberal justice who died aged 87 on September 18th, will lie in repose at the top of the Supreme Court’s steps on Wednesday and Thursday. As mourners pay their respects, Donald Trump and his advisers will be huddling a few miles across town to pick a nominee to replace her. The choice, Mr Trump said on September 21st, will be revealed on Friday or Saturday—days before Ms Ginsburg is to be buried at Arlington National Cemetery.

    Though she gained widespread celebrity as a lion of the liberal legal movement later in her career, Ms Ginsburg arrived at the Supreme Court as a moderate in 1993. The president who tapped her, Bill Clinton, said “she cannot be called a liberal or a conservative” as she has “proved herself too thoughtful for such labels”. Indeed, several progressive groups, including the Alliance for Justice, expressed misgivings at the time that she might not be bold enough on the bench.

  • Donald Trump’s next pick could cement a conservative majority on the Supreme Court for decades to come Link
    The Economist Data Team Tue 22 Sep 2020 09:33

    RUTH BADER GINSBURG, the trailblazing liberal justice who died aged 87 on September 18th, will lie in repose at the top of the Supreme Court’s steps on Wednesday and Thursday. As mourners pay their respects, Donald Trump and his advisers will be huddling a few miles across town to pick a nominee to replace her. The choice, Mr Trump said on September 21st, will be revealed on Friday or Saturday—days before Ms Ginsburg is to be buried at Arlington National Cemetery.

    Though she gained widespread celebrity as a lion of the liberal legal movement later in her career, Ms Ginsburg arrived at the Supreme Court as a moderate in 1993. The president who tapped her, Bill Clinton, said “she cannot be called a liberal or a conservative” as she has “proved herself too thoughtful for such labels”. Indeed, several progressive groups, including the Alliance for Justice, expressed misgivings at the time that she might not be bold enough on the bench.

  • Can the impact of a new Supreme Court judge be measured? Link
    The Economist Data Team Tue 22 Sep 2020 04:12

    RUTH BADER GINSBURG, the trailblazing liberal justice who died aged 87 on September 18th, will lie in repose at the top of the Supreme Court’s steps on Wednesday and Thursday. As mourners pay their respects, Donald Trump and his advisers will be huddling a few miles across town to pick a nominee to replace her. The choice, Mr Trump said on September 21st, will be revealed on Friday or Saturday—days before Ms Ginsburg is to be buried at Arlington National Cemetery.

    Though she gained widespread celebrity as a lion of the liberal legal movement later in her career, Ms Ginsburg arrived at the Supreme Court as a moderate in 1993. The president who tapped her, Bill Clinton, said “she cannot be called a liberal or a conservative” as she has “proved herself too thoughtful for such labels”. Indeed, several progressive groups, including the Alliance for Justice, expressed misgivings at the time that she might not be bold enough on the bench.

  • Although many value investors—including Warren Buffett—have done well in the long run, they have had a rougher time over the past decade Link
    The Economist Data Team Tue 22 Sep 2020 01:42

    FOR MORE than a century scores of investors have prospered through “value investing”, or buying shares in firms which appear cheap given their “fundamentals”. Warren Buffett, an eminently quotable value investor, summarised the approach succinctly: “Whether we’re talking about socks or stocks, I like buying quality merchandise when it is marked down.”

    Although many value investors, including Mr Buffett, have done well in the long run, they have had a rougher time over the past decade. You can gauge just how pricey a stock is by looking at its price-to-book ratio, which measures how much the market thinks a company is worth relative to the net assets on its balance-sheet. Since 2010 the Russell 1000 value index, which tracks American stocks with low price-to-book ratios and low expected earnings growth, has risen by just 87%, compared with 171% for the market overall. Rather than falling back down to earth as value investors might have predicted, shares in the priciest...

  • Chances seem strong that Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s seat—and America's Supreme court—will be radically refashioned by its next occupant Link
    The Economist Data Team Mon 21 Sep 2020 21:32

    RUTH BADER GINSBURG, the trailblazing liberal justice who died aged 87 on September 18th, will lie in repose at the top of the Supreme Court’s steps on Wednesday and Thursday. As mourners pay their respects, Donald Trump and his advisers will be huddling a few miles across town to pick a nominee to replace her. The choice, Mr Trump said on September 21st, will be revealed on Friday or Saturday—days before Ms Ginsburg is to be buried at Arlington National Cemetery.

    Though she gained widespread celebrity as a lion of the liberal legal movement later in her career, Ms Ginsburg arrived at the Supreme Court as a moderate in 1993. The president who tapped her, Bill Clinton, said “she cannot be called a liberal or a conservative” as she has “proved herself too thoughtful for such labels”. Indeed, several progressive groups, including the Alliance for Justice, expressed misgivings at the time that she might not be bold enough on the bench.

  • Growth stocks have increased by 278% over the past decade while value stocks have risen by just 87% Link
    The Economist Data Team Mon 21 Sep 2020 15:22

    FOR MORE than a century scores of investors have prospered through “value investing”, or buying shares in firms which appear cheap given their “fundamentals”. Warren Buffett, an eminently quotable value investor, summarised the approach succinctly: “Whether we’re talking about socks or stocks, I like buying quality merchandise when it is marked down.”

    Although many value investors, including Mr Buffett, have done well in the long run, they have had a rougher time over the past decade. You can gauge just how pricey a stock is by looking at its price-to-book ratio, which measures how much the market thinks a company is worth relative to the net assets on its balance-sheet. Since 2010 the Russell 1000 value index, which tracks American stocks with low price-to-book ratios and low expected earnings growth, has risen by just 87%, compared with 171% for the market overall. Rather than falling back down to earth as value investors might have predicted, shares in the priciest...

  • Twenty years ago, climbers in their 60s had just a one-in-eight chance of reaching Mount Everest’s summit; now the odds are closer to one in three Link
    The Economist Data Team Mon 21 Sep 2020 11:17

    SCALING MOUNT Everest was once a feat reserved for only the bravest mountaineers. These days even relatively inexperienced alpinists attempt the climb. This is in part because it carries less risk. According to a recent paper in PLoS ONE, a journal, just 1% of climbers die on the world’s tallest mountain, with its peak at 8,848 metres (29,029 feet). The success rate, moreover, has more than doubled. Between 2010 and 2019 two-thirds of first-time Everest climbers reached the summit, up from less than one-third in the 1990s. (This year’s season has been cancelled owing to covid-19.)

    Even elderly thrill-seekers now have a shot at reaching the top of the world. The researchers found that success rates have increased across all age groups. Twenty years ago, climbers in their 60s had just a one-in-eight chance of reaching Everest’s summit; now the odds are closer to one in three. Before 2006 no one in their 70s attempted to reach the peak for the first time. Since then the...

  • RT @JamesFransham: What's going on with covid-19 in Europe? (a fast thread: 1/4) New cases are rising quickly in regions of Spain, France a…
    The Economist Data Team Mon 21 Sep 2020 08:57
  • Is value investing still worth it? Link
    The Economist Data Team Mon 21 Sep 2020 00:51

    FOR MORE than a century scores of investors have prospered through “value investing”, or buying shares in firms which appear cheap given their “fundamentals”. Warren Buffett, an eminently quotable value investor, summarised the approach succinctly: “Whether we’re talking about socks or stocks, I like buying quality merchandise when it is marked down.”

    Although many value investors, including Mr Buffett, have done well in the long run, they have had a rougher time over the past decade. You can gauge just how pricey a stock is by looking at its price-to-book ratio, which measures how much the market thinks a company is worth relative to the net assets on its balance-sheet. Since 2010 the Russell 1000 value index, which tracks American stocks with low price-to-book ratios and low expected earnings growth, has risen by just 87%, compared with 171% for the market overall. Rather than falling back down to earth as value investors might have predicted, shares in the priciest...

  • Between 2010 and 2019 two-thirds of first-time Mount Everest climbers reached the summit, up from less than one-third in the 1990s Link
    The Economist Data Team Sun 20 Sep 2020 18:06

    SCALING MOUNT Everest was once a feat reserved for only the bravest mountaineers. These days even relatively inexperienced alpinists attempt the climb. This is in part because it carries less risk. According to a recent paper in PLoS ONE, a journal, just 1% of climbers die on the world’s tallest mountain, with its peak at 8,848 metres (29,029 feet). The success rate, moreover, has more than doubled. Between 2010 and 2019 two-thirds of first-time Everest climbers reached the summit, up from less than one-third in the 1990s. (This year’s season has been cancelled owing to covid-19.)

    Even elderly thrill-seekers now have a shot at reaching the top of the world. The researchers found that success rates have increased across all age groups. Twenty years ago, climbers in their 60s had just a one-in-eight chance of reaching Everest’s summit; now the odds are closer to one in three. Before 2006 no one in their 70s attempted to reach the peak for the first time. Since then the...

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