• The Tories say a vote for the Lib Dems is a vote for Corbyn, while Labour claims a vote for them gets you Brexit. Data prove both wrong ahead of Britain's general election Link
    The Economist Data Team Tue 10 Dec 2019 04:50

    PERHAPS THE only view shared by Britain’s big parties is that backing the Liberal Democrats is a dire risk. “A vote for the Lib Dems gets you Brexit,” Labour warns. “A vote for the Lib Dems risks putting Corbyn in Downing Street,” claim the Tories.

    Both sides cannot be right. However, survey data of 100,000 Britons from YouGov, a pollster, imply that both parties are wrong. Because the Lib Dems have pulled votes equally from their two rivals, further growth in their support would probably cost both Labour and the Tories seats.

    With Labour neutral on Brexit, the Lib Dems are the main national pro-Remain party. Voters have noticed. YouGov’s data show that the few Leavers who backed the Lib Dems in 2017 largely plan to defect. But the party should pick up a fifth of the Remainers who voted Conservative last time, and 13% of Remain-supporting Labourites.

    This has doubled the Lib Dems’ vote share, from 7% in 2017 to 14% in YouGov’s poll. But it may not yield many...

  • Sales of arms and military services by the 100 largest defence firms totalled $420bn in 2018, up by 47% in real terms since 2002 Link
    The Economist Data Team Tue 10 Dec 2019 03:10

    “WE HAVE returned to an era of great-power competition, even constant conflict,” warned Britain’s senior military officer, General Sir Nick Carter, in a speech on December 5th. Bad news for most of us—but a tonic for arms dealers. A report published on December 9th by the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute, a think-tank, shows that sales of arms and military services by the 100 largest defence firms (excluding those in China, where data are patchy) totalled $420bn in 2018, up by 47% in real terms since 2002, the first year for which figures are available.

    The list testifies to America’s dominance of the global military marketplace. The 43 American companies in the top 100 sold $246bn-worth of arms between them in 2018, making up 59% of the list. This year, for the first time, American firms made a clean sweep of the top five, with over a third of all sales. Lockheed Martin, which makes the F-35 warplane, has held the top slot for a decade; it is followed by...

  • Britain’s political landscape has changed beyond recognition in recent years. Explore how with our interactive map Link
    The Economist Data Team Tue 10 Dec 2019 01:45

    BRITAIN’s 66m people are represented in Parliament by 650 MPs—one for each of the country’s 650 constituencies. Explore our map to find out how Britain voted at the 2017 election, and how demographics shape the changing landscape of its political geography.

  • The article behind the 9th door of our advent calendar examines progress for women at work Link
    The Economist Data Team Mon 09 Dec 2019 23:10

    WELCOME to the Daily chart advent calendar. We crunched the numbers behind every chart we published this year to create a festive Christmas countdown. The 24 most popular maps, charts, data visualisations and interactive features sit behind the calendar doors above, and a new door will be available to open every day until Christmas Eve when our most popular infographic of 2019 will be revealed. There’s also a new graphic behind door number 25—a Christmas gift to all our readers.

  • The top-five global defence firms by sales of arms and military services are all American Link
    The Economist Data Team Mon 09 Dec 2019 22:40

    “WE HAVE returned to an era of great-power competition, even constant conflict,” warned Britain’s senior military officer, General Sir Nick Carter, in a speech on December 5th. Bad news for most of us—but a tonic for arms dealers. A report published on December 9th by the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute, a think-tank, shows that sales of arms and military services by the 100 largest defence firms (excluding those in China, where data are patchy) totalled $420bn in 2018, up by 47% in real terms since 2002, the first year for which figures are available.

    The list testifies to America’s dominance of the global military marketplace. The 43 American companies in the top 100 sold $246bn-worth of arms between them in 2018, making up 59% of the list. This year, for the first time, American firms made a clean sweep of the top five, with over a third of all sales. Lockheed Martin, which makes the F-35 warplane, has held the top slot for a decade; it is followed by...

  • Our infographic answers all the questions you never knew you had about voting breakdowns in Britain Link
    The Economist Data Team Mon 09 Dec 2019 20:19

    BRITAIN’s 66m people are represented in Parliament by 650 MPs—one for each of the country’s 650 constituencies. Explore our map to find out how Britain voted at the 2017 election, and how demographics shape the changing landscape of its political geography.

  • Ahead of Britain's general election, we look at the state of the parties last time around Link
    The Economist Data Team Mon 09 Dec 2019 15:19

    BRITAIN’s 66m people are represented in Parliament by 650 MPs—one for each of the country’s 650 constituencies. Explore our map to find out how Britain voted at the 2017 election, and how demographics shape the changing landscape of its political geography.

  • Navigate the different dimensions of Britain’s voting behaviour in 2015 and 2017 with our interactive map Link https://t.co/03EQ5XeQK2
    The Economist Data Team Mon 09 Dec 2019 13:59

    BRITAIN’s 66m people are represented in Parliament by 650 MPs—one for each of the country’s 650 constituencies. Explore our map to find out how Britain voted at the 2017 election, and how demographics shape the changing landscape of its political geography.

  • RT @gelliottmorris: The whole idea that Pete Buttigieg is some sort of savior to anti-Biden moderates has no actual basis in the data. Mode…
    The Economist Data Team Mon 09 Dec 2019 13:49
  • What explains the popularity of the baht and the shekel? Both Thailand and Israel have had low annual inflation Link
    The Economist Data Team Mon 09 Dec 2019 08:44

    The past decade and a half has seen boom and bust, inflation and deflation, globalisation and trade tensions. Through such economic and political cycles you might expect currencies to go in and out of fashion. In fact the two that have strengthened the most against the dollar over this period—Thailand’s baht and Israel’s shekel—have done so consistently. They have outshone other currencies over one, five and ten years, too. What explains their popularity?

    Inflation is part of the answer. Exchange rates partly reflect relative purchasing power, so a country with low inflation should see its currency strengthen against that of a country where prices are rising fast. Both Israel and Thailand have had low annual inflation: 1.4% and 2.2% respectively, on average, over the past 15 years.

  • Data show that late gains for Britain's third party would leave the main two parties worse off Link
    The Economist Data Team Mon 09 Dec 2019 02:09

    PERHAPS THE only view shared by Britain’s big parties is that backing the Liberal Democrats is a dire risk. “A vote for the Lib Dems gets you Brexit,” Labour warns. “A vote for the Lib Dems risks putting Corbyn in Downing Street,” claim the Tories.

    Both sides cannot be right. However, survey data of 100,000 Britons from YouGov, a pollster, imply that both parties are wrong. Because the Lib Dems have pulled votes equally from their two rivals, further growth in their support would probably cost both Labour and the Tories seats.

    With Labour neutral on Brexit, the Lib Dems are the main national pro-Remain party. Voters have noticed. YouGov’s data show that the few Leavers who backed the Lib Dems in 2017 largely plan to defect. But the party should pick up a fifth of the Remainers who voted Conservative last time, and 13% of Remain-supporting Labourites.

    This has doubled the Lib Dems’ vote share, from 7% in 2017 to 14% in YouGov’s poll. But it may not yield many...

  • Thailand’s baht and Israel’s shekel have outshone other currencies over one, five and ten years. What explains their popularity? Link
    The Economist Data Team Sun 08 Dec 2019 21:38

    The past decade and a half has seen boom and bust, inflation and deflation, globalisation and trade tensions. Through such economic and political cycles you might expect currencies to go in and out of fashion. In fact the two that have strengthened the most against the dollar over this period—Thailand’s baht and Israel’s shekel—have done so consistently. They have outshone other currencies over one, five and ten years, too. What explains their popularity?

    Inflation is part of the answer. Exchange rates partly reflect relative purchasing power, so a country with low inflation should see its currency strengthen against that of a country where prices are rising fast. Both Israel and Thailand have had low annual inflation: 1.4% and 2.2% respectively, on average, over the past 15 years.

  • The Economist's data team brings you an advent calendar this year. Here is door eight of 25 Link
    The Economist Data Team Sun 08 Dec 2019 19:58

    WELCOME to the Daily chart advent calendar. We crunched the numbers behind every chart we published this year to create a festive Christmas countdown. The 24 most popular maps, charts, data visualisations and interactive features sit behind the calendar doors above, and a new door will be available to open every day until Christmas Eve when our most popular infographic of 2019 will be revealed. There’s also a new graphic behind door number 25—a Christmas gift to all our readers.

  • Currently the Lib Dems are seeing surging support in former Tory seats, but not enough to swing them Link
    The Economist Data Team Sun 08 Dec 2019 15:48

    PERHAPS THE only view shared by Britain’s big parties is that backing the Liberal Democrats is a dire risk. “A vote for the Lib Dems gets you Brexit,” Labour warns. “A vote for the Lib Dems risks putting Corbyn in Downing Street,” claim the Tories.

    Both sides cannot be right. However, survey data of 100,000 Britons from YouGov, a pollster, imply that both parties are wrong. Because the Lib Dems have pulled votes equally from their two rivals, further growth in their support would probably cost both Labour and the Tories seats.

  • A round-up of the year’s most popular charts, maps and data visualisations Link
    The Economist Data Team Sun 08 Dec 2019 14:23

    WELCOME to the Daily chart advent calendar. We crunched the numbers behind every chart we published this year to create a festive Christmas countdown. The 24 most popular maps, charts, data visualisations and interactive features sit behind the calendar doors above, and a new door will be available to open every day until Christmas Eve when our most popular infographic of 2019 will be revealed. There’s also a new graphic behind door number 25—a Christmas gift to all our readers.

  • The infographic behind the eighth door of our Daily chart advent calendar shows whether Congress is rigged in favour of the rich Link
    The Economist Data Team Sun 08 Dec 2019 12:08

    WELCOME to the Daily chart advent calendar. We crunched the numbers behind every chart we published this year to create a festive Christmas countdown. The 24 most popular maps, charts, data visualisations and interactive features sit behind the calendar doors above, and a new door will be available to open every day until Christmas Eve when our most popular infographic of 2019 will be revealed. There’s also a new graphic behind door number 25—a Christmas gift to all our readers.

  • Our UK election hub combines all our coverage from the campaign trail #GE2019 Link
    The Economist Data Team Sun 08 Dec 2019 08:13

    After years of deadlock and recrimination over Brexit, Britain is heading for another general election on December 12th to try to settle the matter. It will be the country’s third election in less than five years. Boris Johnson, the prime minister, will be hoping to improve upon the disastrous performance of his predecessor, Theresa May, whose snap election in 2017 backfired. Her Conservative Party threw away a 17-seat majority, and had to govern with the support of Northern Ireland’s Democratic Unionist Party. That has blocked the government’s ability either to pass a Brexit deal or leave the EU without a deal.

  • How often does Congress side with the rich? Look behind the eighth door of our Daily chart advent calendar to find out Link
    The Economist Data Team Sun 08 Dec 2019 02:43

    WELCOME to the Daily chart advent calendar. We crunched the numbers behind every chart we published this year to create a festive Christmas countdown. The 24 most popular maps, charts, data visualisations and interactive features sit behind the calendar doors above, and a new door will be available to open every day until Christmas Eve when our most popular infographic of 2019 will be revealed. There’s also a new graphic behind door number 25—a Christmas gift to all our readers.

  • All the news, data and analysis from Britain's general election campaign can be found on our hub: Link
    The Economist Data Team Sat 07 Dec 2019 22:02

    After years of deadlock and recrimination over Brexit, Britain is heading for another general election on December 12th to try to settle the matter. It will be the country’s third election in less than five years. Boris Johnson, the prime minister, will be hoping to improve upon the disastrous performance of his predecessor, Theresa May, whose snap election in 2017 backfired. Her Conservative Party threw away a 17-seat majority, and had to govern with the support of Northern Ireland’s Democratic Unionist Party. That has blocked the government’s ability either to pass a Brexit deal or leave the EU without a deal.

  • What's behind the seventh door of our Daily chart advent calendar? Link
    The Economist Data Team Sat 07 Dec 2019 20:37

    WELCOME to the Daily chart advent calendar. We crunched the numbers behind every chart we published this year to create a festive Christmas countdown. The 24 most popular maps, charts, data visualisations and interactive features sit behind the calendar doors above, and a new door will be available to open every day until Christmas Eve when our most popular infographic of 2019 will be revealed. There’s also a new graphic behind door number 25—a Christmas gift to all our readers.

  • Between the Lib Dems and Labour, the only close fight is in Sheffield Hallam Link
    The Economist Data Team Sat 07 Dec 2019 18:52

    PERHAPS THE only view shared by Britain’s big parties is that backing the Liberal Democrats is a dire risk. “A vote for the Lib Dems gets you Brexit,” Labour warns. “A vote for the Lib Dems risks putting Corbyn in Downing Street,” claim the Tories.

    Both sides cannot be right. However, survey data of 100,000 Britons from YouGov, a pollster, imply that both parties are wrong. Because the Lib Dems have pulled votes equally from their two rivals, further growth in their support would probably cost both Labour and the Tories seats.

  • Our analysis of election polls since 2015 Link
    The Economist Data Team Sat 07 Dec 2019 17:47
  • Who is ahead in the polls? What are the best quotes from campaign trail this week? All our UK election coverage in one place: Link
    The Economist Data Team Sat 07 Dec 2019 16:17

    After years of deadlock and recrimination over Brexit, Britain is heading for another general election on December 12th to try to settle the matter. It will be the country’s third election in less than five years. Boris Johnson, the prime minister, will be hoping to improve upon the disastrous performance of his predecessor, Theresa May, whose snap election in 2017 backfired. Her Conservative Party threw away a 17-seat majority, and had to govern with the support of Northern Ireland’s Democratic Unionist Party. That has blocked the government’s ability either to pass a Brexit deal or leave the EU without a deal.

  • Where is the sweet spot between lowering taxes and raising revenues? Look behind the 7th door of our Daily chart advent calendar to find out Link
    The Economist Data Team Sat 07 Dec 2019 13:02

    WELCOME to the Daily chart advent calendar. We crunched the numbers behind every chart we published this year to create a festive Christmas countdown. The 24 most popular maps, charts, data visualisations and interactive features sit behind the calendar doors above, and a new door will be available to open every day until Christmas Eve when our most popular infographic of 2019 will be revealed. There’s also a new graphic behind door number 25—a Christmas gift to all our readers.

  • The 2019 Daily chart advent calendar Link
    The Economist Data Team Sat 07 Dec 2019 09:42

    WELCOME to the Daily chart advent calendar. We crunched the numbers behind every chart we published this year to create a festive Christmas countdown. The 24 most popular maps, charts, data visualisations and interactive features sit behind the calendar doors above, and a new door will be available to open every day until Christmas Eve when our most popular infographic of 2019 will be revealed. There’s also a new graphic behind door number 25—a Christmas gift to all our readers.

S&P500
VIX
Eurostoxx50
FTSE100
Nikkei 225
TNX (UST10y)
EURUSD
GBPUSD
USDJPY
BTCUSD
Gold spot
Brent
Copper
Last update . Delayed by 15 mins. Prices from Yahoo!