• Average fuel prices edge slightly lower for a second week: Diesel dips to $3.04 per gallon and gasoline to $2.54 Link https://t.co/QOSiQSPHzN
    St. Louis Fed Thu 23 Jan 2020 05:50
  • Surprisingly, the average telecommuter still drove more miles annually in 2017 than the average worker who had to travel to a workplace Link https://t.co/EltmFm1kh2
    St. Louis Fed Thu 23 Jan 2020 04:45
    The share of Americans who primarily work from home has risen in recent decades, from 0.7% of full-time employees in 1980 to 3% in 2017. The share of telecommuting workers differs among cities, and this appears to be due to variations in the mix of occupations. In 2017, the average worker who usually telecommutes drove more miles annually than the average worker who has to travel to a workplace.
  • FRED has added more Bureau of Labor Statistics data on average retail prices. Now you can see how much the average consumer pays for selected utility, automotive fuel and food items – like bananas Link https://t.co/Vppmc0MWcB
    St. Louis Fed Thu 23 Jan 2020 03:30
  • What makes a city more desirable to live in than the next? See how Eighth District cities fare: Link #STLFedCD https://t.co/VH3CazAbHE
    St. Louis Fed Thu 23 Jan 2020 02:05

    Was your city more or less populous in 2018 than in 2017? Did it become a more affordable place to live? But what about other characteristics? The St. Louis Fed’s Center for Household Financial Stability took an in-depth look at four Eighth District cities (St. Louis, Little Rock, Ark., Louisville, Ky., and Memphis, Tenn.) to explore how dynamics are shifting.

    Had the city, or rather, the county in which the city is located, improved from the previous year? To answer this question I used 15 metrics, including: growth in total population, median income, median rent prices, median housing prices, homeownership rates, poverty rates, food stamp take-up, unemployment rates, health insurance coverage, commute times, racial diversity, share of college graduates and high school graduates, graduates moving into the county, and income inequality. The census rates in the 2018 American Community Survey were compared to the 2017 rates. Findings are summarized in the table...

  • FHFA report: U.S. house prices rose 0.2% in November, while October’s previously reported gain of 0.2% was revised up to 0.4% Link https://t.co/fDAiDzAi17
    St. Louis Fed Thu 23 Jan 2020 00:35
  • Our blog spotlights Clinton Barney, who specializes in talent development and employee learning at the St. Louis Fed Link https://t.co/YskqSImkai
    St. Louis Fed Wed 22 Jan 2020 23:20

    With a military and law enforcement background, Clinton joined the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis in 2010 and started working in the Law Enforcement Unit. His plan was to work for the Fed for five years and then apply to the FBI.

    Nearly a decade later, Clinton stayed on — having transitioned his professional path from law enforcement to talent development.

    A big part of his job now involves making new employees feel comfortable and equipped to succeed, so they’ll stay on for years to come, too.

  • Mexico was the largest source nation of green card holders (U.S. permanent residents) from FY 1989 to FY 2017. Which countries were No. 2 and No. 3? Link https://t.co/dxZxo8LAxk
    St. Louis Fed Wed 22 Jan 2020 22:05
    From 1989 to 2017, Mexico was the largest source of U.S. lawful permanent residents, or green card holders. Other big sources were China, the Philippines and India. While many green cards are given to family members of U.S. citizens and permanent residents, a large number also go to skilled workers. Green card holders, on average, are younger than the overall U.S. population. They could help support an aging U.S. population in the future.
  • Staff pick: Single and cohabitating young households are more likely to hold student loan debt than most other forms of debt, but student loan debt is only the fourth most commonly held debt for married young households Link https://t.co/TSeVVnxYzf
    St. Louis Fed Wed 22 Jan 2020 18:35

    They also noted that the share of unmarried partnered households rose over the same period. While the share of married households dropped from around 57 percent in 1989 to 37 percent in 2016, the share of partnered households rose from about 7 percent to 21 percent.

  • What makes a city more desirable to live in than the next? See how Eighth District cities fare: Link #STLFedCD https://t.co/zuCQbE1mcv
    St. Louis Fed Wed 22 Jan 2020 15:30

    Was your city more or less populous in 2018 than in 2017? Did it become a more affordable place to live? But what about other characteristics? The St. Louis Fed’s Center for Household Financial Stability took an in-depth look at four Eighth District cities (St. Louis, Little Rock, Ark., Louisville, Ky., and Memphis, Tenn.) to explore how dynamics are shifting.

    Had the city, or rather, the county in which the city is located, improved from the previous year? To answer this question I used 15 metrics, including: growth in total population, median income, median rent prices, median housing prices, homeownership rates, poverty rates, food stamp take-up, unemployment rates, health insurance coverage, commute times, racial diversity, share of college graduates and high school graduates, graduates moving into the county, and income inequality. The census rates in the 2018 American Community Survey were compared to the 2017 rates. Findings are summarized in the table...

  • “What my parents had me do was, I had to live at home if I wanted to go to college because they had four more children coming down the line. My parents said, ‘We can’t afford for you to go away to school.’” Link
    St. Louis Fed Wed 22 Jan 2020 13:45
  • Staff pick: The share of young households with student loan debt has risen across all marital statuses. But married households are more likely to hold other forms of debt, while it’s the first or second most commonly held for single households Link
    St. Louis Fed Wed 22 Jan 2020 05:24

    They also noted that the share of unmarried partnered households rose over the same period. While the share of married households dropped from around 57 percent in 1989 to 37 percent in 2016, the share of partnered households rose from about 7 percent to 21 percent.

  • Listen to our latest #WomeninEconomics podcast episode by asking your Amazon device, “Alexa, play Timely Topics from TuneIn.” Link
    St. Louis Fed Wed 22 Jan 2020 04:14

    Less than a third of the students who graduate with bachelor’s degrees in economics are women. That percentage of women further dwindles as careers in economics advance.

    In our Women in Economics Podcast Series, we highlight the studies and careers of those making their marks in the field of economics.

  • Check out the hundreds of educational resources available online from #EconLowdown Link https://t.co/IH1GdGWYfO
    St. Louis Fed Wed 22 Jan 2020 03:04

    Your planning and classroom times are limited. Our free economics and personal finance lessons, activities, and readings provide flexibility and real-world connections, making it easier to prepare students with 21st century skills for college and career readiness. We have great resources for consumers and parents, too!

  • The percentage of the full-time employees who usually work from home can differ among metro areas. This appears to be due to variations in a region’s occupational mix Link https://t.co/SrWqYyZQvg
    St. Louis Fed Wed 22 Jan 2020 01:54
    The share of Americans who primarily work from home has risen in recent decades, from 0.7% of full-time employees in 1980 to 3% in 2017. The share of telecommuting workers differs among cities, and this appears to be due to variations in the mix of occupations. In 2017, the average worker who usually telecommutes drove more miles annually than the average worker who has to travel to a workplace.
  • Staff pick: The share of young households that are married has fallen, while the wealth of such households is nearly triple that of other young households Link https://t.co/qYnV5FHzDS
    St. Louis Fed Wed 22 Jan 2020 00:44

    They also noted that the share of cohabitating households among young adults rose over the same period. While the share of married households dropped from around 57 percent in 1989 to 37 percent in 2016, the share of partnered households rose from about 7 percent to 21 percent.

  • Per statistical office #Eurostat, real GDP rose 0.3% in Q3 from the previous quarter in both the European Union (EU-28) and the euro area (EA-19). See FRED for the latest results by country Link https://t.co/tAr13OPMAO
    St. Louis Fed Tue 21 Jan 2020 23:34
  • “What my parents had me do was, I had to live at home if I wanted to go to college because they had four more children coming down the line. My parents said, ‘We can’t afford for you to go away to school.’” Link
    St. Louis Fed Tue 21 Jan 2020 22:24
  • Staff pick: Single and cohabitating young households are more likely to hold student loan debt than most other forms of debt, but student loan debt is only the fourth most commonly held debt for married young households Link https://t.co/tPQCWFMTbL
    St. Louis Fed Tue 21 Jan 2020 21:14

    They also noted that the share of unmarried partnered households rose over the same period. While the share of married households dropped from around 57 percent in 1989 to 37 percent in 2016, the share of partnered households rose from about 7 percent to 21 percent.

  • Over four decades, wealth tripled for households with a college degree but barely grew for others. Find out more: Link https://t.co/aykgOs7oQa
    St. Louis Fed Tue 21 Jan 2020 18:49

    Using new long-run microdata, this article studies wealth and income trends of households with a college degree (college households) and without a college degree (noncollege households) in the United States since 1956. We document the emergence of a substantial college wealth premium since the 1980s, which is considerably larger than the college income premium. Over the past four decades, the wealth of college households has tripled. By contrast, the wealth of noncollege households has barely grown in real terms over the same period. Part of the rising wealth gap can be traced back to systematic portfolio differences between college and noncollege households that give rise to different exposures to asset price changes. Noncollege households have lower exposure to the equity market and have profited much less from the recent surge in the stock market. We also discuss the importance of financial literacy and business ownership for the increase in wealth inequality between...

  • “Can you as a leader promulgate a vision such that others are compelled to be a part of that by virtue of watching you?” Women leaders share what it takes to advance and thrive at a panel discussion by our VIEW employee resource group: Link https://t.co/X2lGmEUNmH
    St. Louis Fed Tue 21 Jan 2020 15:49

    By Matuschka Lindo Briggs, Public Affairs Staff

    What does it take to shatter the glass ceiling?

    You are almost certainly familiar with the term: a transparent barrier to professional advancement, especially affecting women and minorities.

    Do you still have a glass ceiling at your place of employment? Is your company helping women to shatter or at least crack it?

    At the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, we have been fortunate to have many women pave the way. Our VIEW (Valuing, Inspiring, Empowering Women) employee resource group hosted an event featuring four women on our Bank’s top leadership team.

    These are women leaders who actively connect with and coach staff at the Bank throughout the year on issues of professional growth and development, and they brought that spirit to the VIEW. They shared their personal and professional journeys. They opened up about strategies that were helpful to them during their careers and that can...

  • Discover a northeastern Missouri program’s fresh efforts to boost #homeownership Link #STLFedCD https://t.co/VDjKxid4JB
    St. Louis Fed Tue 21 Jan 2020 13:38

    Communities across the Federal Reserve’s Eighth District have sought to make housing more accessible by expanding access to homebuyer education and down payment assistance. These endeavors have proven to be beneficial, as residents are seeing increased access to credit and homeownership. But, homeownership is most often possible when communities have land prime for development or when move-in ready homes are already on the market—unfortunately, that is not always the case in rural areas.

    Missouri’s North East Community Action Corporation (NECAC) understands this challenge firsthand. Of the 12 counties in their service area, nine are rural. According to Carla Plotts, NECAC’s deputy director for housing development, housing stock is the largest of many challenges facing northeast Missouri. While the region has a wealth of land, home and neighborhood development has not kept up with area demand. Moreover, the existing housing stock is older and in need of repair. Since...

  • Staff pick: Married young households are typically wealthier than other young adults, including cohabitating households Link https://t.co/uupzEDZwUN
    St. Louis Fed Tue 21 Jan 2020 03:33

    They also noted that the share of cohabitating households among young adults rose over the same period. While the share of married households dropped from around 57 percent in 1989 to 37 percent in 2016, the share of partnered households rose from about 7 percent to 21 percent.

  • Chart CO2 emissions by source like electric power, residential and transportation in the latest addition to FRED from @EIAgov Link https://t.co/UcYVXoEGvf
    St. Louis Fed Tue 21 Jan 2020 02:03
  • A college degree pays off in more income now—and in more wealth later. Does financial literacy play a key role? Link
    St. Louis Fed Tue 21 Jan 2020 00:53

    Using new long-run microdata, this article studies wealth and income trends of households with a college degree (college households) and without a college degree (noncollege households) in the United States since 1956. We document the emergence of a substantial college wealth premium since the 1980s, which is considerably larger than the college income premium. Over the past four decades, the wealth of college households has tripled. By contrast, the wealth of noncollege households has barely grown in real terms over the same period. Part of the rising wealth gap can be traced back to systematic portfolio differences between college and noncollege households that give rise to different exposures to asset price changes. Noncollege households have lower exposure to the equity market and have profited much less from the recent surge in the stock market. We also discuss the importance of financial literacy and business ownership for the increase in wealth inequality between...

  • Here’s a glimpse into the state of current retirees’ household wealth compared with that of past retirees Link
    St. Louis Fed Mon 20 Jan 2020 23:38

    By YiLi Chien, QiuhanSun

    How financially fit are U.S. retirees? How has their financial position evolved over time?

    There has been a growing interest in these issues as aging baby boomers continue to retire. Some argue that the retirement situation is mixed for Americans, with many approaching retirement age with little or no retirement savings.¹

    This article offers a glimpse into the state of current retirees’ household wealth compared with that of past retirees.

S&P500
VIX
Eurostoxx50
FTSE100
Nikkei 225
TNX (UST10y)
EURUSD
GBPUSD
USDJPY
BTCUSD
Gold spot
Brent
Copper
Last update . Delayed by 15 mins. Prices from Yahoo!