• Here’s the small but spirited #K9 who safeguards our Memphis Branch #DogsofTwitter Link https://t.co/PiYk1IoI8E
    St. Louis Fed Wed 18 Sep 2019 17:46

    This month brings the observation of National K-9 Veterans Day (March 13). This post is the fifth in an ongoing series, “A Different Breed of Officer,” featuring the St. Louis Fed’s K-9 program. We are profiling the dogs and handlers who dedicate their lives to keeping employees and visitors safe. For security reasons, names are not used.

    By Christine Smith, Public Affairs Staff

    Visitors to the St. Louis Fed’s Memphis Branch may get to see our K-9 handler and his dog helping to safeguard the facility. The two are quite a pair: A sturdy man with a deep voice. A small Dutch shepherd that’s a ball of energy.

    We spoke with our Law Enforcement colleague and his canine partner—code name: “Officer P”—to hear their story and what it’s like to protect the Fed.

  • #CentralBankerEnews: These Cyber Talk videos guide bank leaders on managing cyber risks Link https://t.co/YSVudmsJMj
    St. Louis Fed Wed 18 Sep 2019 14:35

    Cyber Talk is a six-part video series for bank executives and board members that can be used as a tool to facilitate discussions on cybersecurity. The series discusses the importance of developing a cybersecurity framework and suggests processes for implementation.

    A one-page Cyber Talk Guide has also been created to facilitate cybersecurity conversations between bank senior management and its board. The Guide includes a glossary of key terms that are used in the Cyber Talk video series and offers a five-point outline to help bankers think about how to best implement a cybersecurity framework.

  • Choose a recipient, enter an amount, hit continue … what else should consumers know about digital money transfers? Link https://t.co/xkyaRs3cZ6
    St. Louis Fed Wed 18 Sep 2019 12:45

    Pretty standard stuff, right? In fact, person-to-person (P2P) money transfers using digital wallets (or mobile wallets, when using smartphones) are booming.

    A recent Forbes article noted that Venmo, which is PayPal’s P2P payments service, reportedly processed $62 billion in these payments in 2018. The same article said that Zelle, the digital payments platform created by some of the nation’s largest banks and available through mobile banking apps, handled nearly double that amount in 2018, or $122 billion.

    While these transactions are increasingly common, ever wonder what happens to your money after you hit send?

    In a recent blog post and a podcast, Julie Stackhouse of the St. Louis Fed’s banking supervision division explains what happens behind the scenes with money transfer transactions, as well as other topics related to financial technology—aka fintech.

  • FRED has added more Bureau of Labor Statistics data on average retail prices. Now you can see how much the average consumer pays for selected utility, automotive fuel and food items – like bacon Link https://t.co/mTVgNwDMwJ
    St. Louis Fed Wed 18 Sep 2019 03:45
  • U.S. industrial production rose 0.6% in August, the largest increase in a year, while July's reading was revised to a 0.1% decline from an initially reported 0.2% drop Link https://t.co/A57AyEreaW
    St. Louis Fed Wed 18 Sep 2019 02:20
  • Average price per gallon for diesel in the U.S. ticks up slightly to $2.987 in the latest reporting week Link https://t.co/T1d1K1a6vo
    St. Louis Fed Wed 18 Sep 2019 01:05
  • Last year, FRED saw a visitor from nearly every country. Where do you use FRED? #LetsFREDthat Link https://t.co/EXrB4F6qYc
    St. Louis Fed Tue 17 Sep 2019 23:50
  • Person-to-person money transfers using digital wallets (or mobile wallets, when using smartphones) are booming. Here’s what to consider: Link https://t.co/FNFezKaEpf
    St. Louis Fed Tue 17 Sep 2019 22:40

    Pretty standard stuff, right? In fact, person-to-person (P2P) money transfers using digital wallets (or mobile wallets, when using smartphones) are booming.

    A recent Forbes article noted that Venmo, which is PayPal’s P2P payments service, reportedly processed $62 billion in these payments in 2018. The same article said that Zelle, the digital payments platform created by some of the nation’s largest banks and available through mobile banking apps, handled nearly double that amount in 2018, or $122 billion.

    While these transactions are increasingly common, ever wonder what happens to your money after you hit send?

    In a recent blog post and a podcast, Julie Stackhouse of the St. Louis Fed’s banking supervision division explains what happens behind the scenes with money transfer transactions, as well as other topics related to financial technology—aka fintech.

  • Little changed from the week prior, average price per gallon for U.S. gasoline is $2.552 Link https://t.co/GW7L9jBfeC
    St. Louis Fed Tue 17 Sep 2019 21:40
  • What are the different sources of state tax revenue? The FRED Blog takes a look Link https://t.co/zUMzql15px
    St. Louis Fed Tue 17 Sep 2019 20:24

    State governments run on tax revenue in much the same way the federal government does. The FRED graph above shows the specific shares of state tax revenue from many sources. The two major sources are sales tax and individual income tax. While there’s a clear seasonal pattern (mostly from income taxes), there are no strong trends: The shares seem rather stable. If we look a little more closely, though, we can see a shift from corporate income tax to individual income tax and a decrease in motor fuel tax revenue. Granted, it’s not perfectly clear unless you look at the numbers directly. So, if you’re using a mouse, hover over the graph to reveal the values for each series for a particular date, including the percentages. Given the seasonal pattern, it’s best to compare the same quarter over several years—say, the yearly peaks in the second quarter.

    How this graph was created: From the release table on State and Local Tax Revenue, click on “national totals of state...

  • This Dutch shepherd works at our Memphis Branch. Her handler says she’s “unlike any dog he has ever worked with before.” #DogsofTwitter Link https://t.co/UONojsPgEk
    St. Louis Fed Tue 17 Sep 2019 17:49

    This month brings the observation of National K-9 Veterans Day (March 13). This post is the fifth in an ongoing series, “A Different Breed of Officer,” featuring the St. Louis Fed’s K-9 program. We are profiling the dogs and handlers who dedicate their lives to keeping employees and visitors safe. For security reasons, names are not used.

    By Christine Smith, Public Affairs Staff

    Visitors to the St. Louis Fed’s Memphis Branch may get to see our K-9 handler and his dog helping to safeguard the facility. The two are quite a pair: A sturdy man with a deep voice. A small Dutch shepherd that’s a ball of energy.

    We spoke with our Law Enforcement colleague and his canine partner—code name: “Officer P”—to hear their story and what it’s like to protect the Fed.

  • Are Students Borrowing Too Much? Or Too Little? Most student loan balances fall on the smaller side of the scale Link https://t.co/2w9DUWlwwP
    St. Louis Fed Tue 17 Sep 2019 14:44

    By Julian Kozlowski, Economist, and Mahdi Ebsim, Research Associate

    Total student debt has risen to levels greater than credit card and auto debt, leading to increasing worries from many policymakers and institutions. One of these concerns, for example, is that those high debt burdens would prevent students from pursuing socially beneficial careers.

    As we noted in a recent Regional Economist article, New York University made its medical school tuition free for fear that higher debt burdens would deter students from becoming doctors. Also, Michael Bloomberg—the billionaire and former New York City mayor—made the largest contribution ever to any higher-education institution in the U.S., donating $1.8 billion to Johns Hopkins University to be devoted exclusively to financial aid. This fall, Johns Hopkins became a loan-free institution as it replaced all undergraduate student loans with scholarships.

    Which type of student debt policies can generate the...

  • On Wednesday, the Federal Open Market Committee will release its monetary policy statement and Chair Powell will hold a press conference Link https://t.co/xSSeJkwrQR
    St. Louis Fed Tue 17 Sep 2019 12:24

    In order to aid in the retrieval of information from this publication, significant tables, charts, and/or articles have been extracted and can be viewed individually or across a span of issues.

  • Real-life competition in your econ classroom, workplace, book club, pickleball league...play FREDcast today Link https://t.co/Mwf7Vb5F5I
    St. Louis Fed Tue 17 Sep 2019 03:33

    Thousands of economics students from the University of Illinois and the University of Missouri have challenged each other in the realm of economic forecasting. Over the years, each school has claimed victory in their FREDcast Battle League and the rivalry continues…

  • #FinLit tip: Young kids who see adults pay with credit cards or phones may not recognize the link to money. Teach them about responsible saving/spending now #EconLowdown Link https://t.co/pNRACEEvNt
    St. Louis Fed Tue 17 Sep 2019 02:43

    By Mary Suiter, Assistant Vice President and Economic Education Officer

    At an age when children are busy playing with their new Legos or asking for Happy Meals, they’re also forming early and foundational ideas about earning, saving and spending that they may carry with them throughout their lives.

    Children often develop their financial behaviors as early as 7 years of age, according to research by David Whitebread and Sue Bingham (PDF) of the University of Cambridge in England.

    So, waiting until students are in high school to teach personal finance and economics can mean missing valuable opportunities to help them learn and shape their habits. And it leaves children, during very impressionable years, more apt to construct their understanding of the economy and personal finance from what they observe around them.

    This frequently results in misunderstandings. For example, children who see their parents get money from an ATM may not have the...

  • The FRED Blog uses Census data to track trends in state tax revenue sources, including a shift from corporate to individual income taxes Link https://t.co/BJvkw1aDMh
    St. Louis Fed Tue 17 Sep 2019 01:58

    State governments run on tax revenue in much the same way the federal government does. The FRED graph above shows the specific shares of state tax revenue from many sources. The two major sources are sales tax and individual income tax. While there’s a clear seasonal pattern (mostly from income taxes), there are no strong trends: The shares seem rather stable. If we look a little more closely, though, we can see a shift from corporate income tax to individual income tax and a decrease in motor fuel tax revenue. Granted, it’s not perfectly clear unless you look at the numbers directly. So, if you’re using a mouse, hover over the graph to reveal the values for each series for a particular date, including the percentages. Given the seasonal pattern, it’s best to compare the same quarter over several years—say, the yearly peaks in the second quarter.

    How this graph was created: From the release table on State and Local Tax Revenue, click on “national totals of state...

  • This is what it’s like to work with your best friend #K9 #DogsofTwitter Link https://t.co/2MlPo1Fdmf
    St. Louis Fed Tue 17 Sep 2019 00:53

    This month brings the observation of National K-9 Veterans Day (March 13). This post is the fifth in an ongoing series, “A Different Breed of Officer,” featuring the St. Louis Fed’s K-9 program. We are profiling the dogs and handlers who dedicate their lives to keeping employees and visitors safe. For security reasons, names are not used.

    By Christine Smith, Public Affairs Staff

    Visitors to the St. Louis Fed’s Memphis Branch may get to see our K-9 handler and his dog helping to safeguard the facility. The two are quite a pair: A sturdy man with a deep voice. A small Dutch shepherd that’s a ball of energy.

    We spoke with our Law Enforcement colleague and his canine partner—code name: “Officer P”—to hear their story and what it’s like to protect the Fed.

  • What are the different sources of state tax revenue? The FRED Blog takes a look Link https://t.co/fUCkeSmYz9
    St. Louis Fed Mon 16 Sep 2019 23:48

    State governments run on tax revenue in much the same way the federal government does. The FRED graph above shows the specific shares of state tax revenue from many sources. The two major sources are sales tax and individual income tax. While there’s a clear seasonal pattern (mostly from income taxes), there are no strong trends: The shares seem rather stable. If we look a little more closely, though, we can see a shift from corporate income tax to individual income tax and a decrease in motor fuel tax revenue. Granted, it’s not perfectly clear unless you look at the numbers directly. So, if you’re using a mouse, hover over the graph to reveal the values for each series for a particular date, including the percentages. Given the seasonal pattern, it’s best to compare the same quarter over several years—say, the yearly peaks in the second quarter.

    How this graph was created: From the release table on State and Local Tax Revenue, click on “national totals of state...

  • After rising to its highest level since May 2017 the previous week, the trade-weighted U.S. dollar index dips in the latest week, down to 92.4 (March 1973=100) Link https://t.co/1smEBmi27H
    St. Louis Fed Mon 16 Sep 2019 22:33
  • Are Students Borrowing Too Much? Or Too Little? Most student loan balances fall on the smaller side of the scale Link https://t.co/qVJ9PQkDvx
    St. Louis Fed Mon 16 Sep 2019 21:28

    By Julian Kozlowski, Economist, and Mahdi Ebsim, Research Associate

    Total student debt has risen to levels greater than credit card and auto debt, leading to increasing worries from many policymakers and institutions. One of these concerns, for example, is that those high debt burdens would prevent students from pursuing socially beneficial careers.

    As we noted in a recent Regional Economist article, New York University made its medical school tuition free for fear that higher debt burdens would deter students from becoming doctors. Also, Michael Bloomberg—the billionaire and former New York City mayor—made the largest contribution ever to any higher-education institution in the U.S., donating $1.8 billion to Johns Hopkins University to be devoted exclusively to financial aid. This fall, Johns Hopkins became a loan-free institution as it replaced all undergraduate student loans with scholarships.

    Which type of student debt policies can generate the...

  • On Wednesday, the Federal Open Market Committee will release its monetary policy statement and Chair Powell will hold a press conference Link https://t.co/CxcfMhNoQS
    St. Louis Fed Mon 16 Sep 2019 20:43

    In order to aid in the retrieval of information from this publication, significant tables, charts, and/or articles have been extracted and can be viewed individually or across a span of issues.

  • 1-minute demo: How to graph jobs data (nonfarm payrolls) over a set time period #LetsFREDthat #dataliteracy Link https://t.co/hWnT3Zf33z
    St. Louis Fed Mon 16 Sep 2019 17:18
  • Bankruptcy: What’s the difference between Chapter 7 and Chapter 13? Link https://t.co/49UpKTCiuJ
    St. Louis Fed Mon 16 Sep 2019 14:38

    By Jessica Guo, Economic Education Intern

    “It is said that the world is in a state of bankruptcy; that the world owes the world more than the world can pay ...” – Ralph Waldo Emerson

    Chapter 13 bankruptcy originally arose from the need to look out for wage earners, and to this day, what differentiates it most from Chapter 7 is the idea that as long as regular efforts are made to get out of debt, property can be kept and wages can be free of garnishment.

    This blog post explains some of the differences between Chapter 7 and Chapter 13. It provides some takeaways about the economics of bankruptcy, as well. (This information is not to be taken as legal advice.)

  • Intellectual property rights protection is key to promoting international technology transfer, which is important for economic growth, especially in developing countries Link https://t.co/c2brW0hbdK
    St. Louis Fed Mon 16 Sep 2019 12:48

    By Ana Maria Santacreu, Economist, and Makenzie Peake, Research Associate

    Good protection and enforcement of intellectual property rights (IPR) are key to promoting international technology transfer, which is important for economic growth, especially in developing economies

  • U.S. export prices slipped 0.6% in August as prices for nonagricultural and agricultural products declined 0.4% and 2.5%, respectively Link https://t.co/WYgktNO4UJ
    St. Louis Fed Mon 16 Sep 2019 04:07
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