• We're discussing mushrooms in tonight's #BusinessMatters ? You can get in touch via: ? world.business@bbc.co.uk ? or leave a comment Link https://t.co/M0tDo7erlB
    BBC Business Fri 15 Nov 2019 18:01
  • This city has turned underground car parks into mushrooms farms ? #BusinessMatters Link https://t.co/dyupToUwCD
    BBC Business Fri 15 Nov 2019 17:56
  • We're discussing mushrooms in tonight's #BusinessMatters ? Let us know your thoughts below or email world.business@bbc.co.uk Link
    BBC Business Fri 15 Nov 2019 17:51
  • Have you much room for mushrooms in your life? ? This city has turned underground car parks into mushrooms farms #BusinessMatters Link https://t.co/otygXXL89w
    BBC Business Fri 15 Nov 2019 17:46
  • Should the wealthy pay more tax? We asked the question on #WorldBusinessReport Link
    BBC Business Fri 15 Nov 2019 16:56
  • Is Facebook getting better at finding harmful content or is it losing control of the problem? #BBCTechTent Link
    BBC Business Fri 15 Nov 2019 16:51
  • Why does Labour want to give away free broadband? Link
    BBC Business Fri 15 Nov 2019 16:46

    Whereas Margaret Thatcher recast the privatisations of the 1980s into share giveaways that popularised mass participation capitalism to some voters, this Labour move seeks to do the exact reverse, nearly four decades on.

    It is an attempt to turn state ownership into an election-friendly retail policy: free broadband for all.

    It is really two policies in one. The theory behind nationalisation has traditionally been about industrial policy - the government taking a view on the strategic direction of the economy.

    This move is more than that - shifting the state into the provision of what is known as "universal basic services". Formerly thought of as health and education, now Labour wants to add broadband too.

    Since the early 1980s, even before BT was privatised, and the internet existed, Labour politicians have argued for a national Government roll out of fibre optic connections.

  • Two prominent US Democratic contenders are calling for a new wealth tax to help fund health care and education – is this the politics of envy or a way to address inequality? #WorldBusinessReport Link https://t.co/cGfgX97xSQ
    BBC Business Fri 15 Nov 2019 16:36
  • Apple is removing all vaping apps from its online store Link
    BBC Business Fri 15 Nov 2019 15:46

    In a statement given to Axios, Apple said it agreed with official warnings about the negative health impacts of vaping and the potential problem presented by the appeal of e-cigarettes to the young.

  • "It’s not a typical person who can run a bakery... all of us are a little bit crazy" Why a career in baking bread is not for the fainthearted #BBCFoodChain Link https://t.co/KgVpuBkdaB
    BBC Business Fri 15 Nov 2019 15:36
  • Why running a bakery is like doing a triathlon, and why we've been eating bread all wrong ? #BBCFoodChain Link
    BBC Business Fri 15 Nov 2019 15:26
  • RT @BBCTech: Will fibre broadband be obsolete by 2030 - and what about 5G? Link
    BBC Business Fri 15 Nov 2019 15:21

    Labour has promised to give every home and business in the UK free full-fibre broadband by 2030 if it wins the general election.

    The plan would see millions more properties given access to a full-fibre connection, though Prime Minister Boris Johnson said it was "a crackpot scheme".

    If the plan went ahead and was completed on time, would it still be useful in 2030?

  • "In 10 years time everybody will be 'wearing' digital fashion... it's a sign of the times" Link
    BBC Business Fri 15 Nov 2019 15:11

    Earlier this year Richard Ma, the chief executive of San Francisco-based security company Quantstamp, spent $9,500 (£7,500) on a dress for his wife.

    That is a lot of money for a dress, particularly when it does not exist, at least not in a physical form.

    Instead it was a digital dress, designed by fashion house The Fabricant, rendered on to an image of Richard's wife, Mary Ren, which can then be used on social media.

    "It's definitely very expensive, but it's also like an investment," Mr Ma says.

    He explains that he and his wife don't usually buy expensive clothing, but he wanted this piece because he thinks it has long-term value.

  • "In 10 years time everybody will be 'wearing' digital fashion... it's a sign of the times" The fashion collections that only exist in digital form Link https://t.co/XA5z7gBCdD
    BBC Business Fri 15 Nov 2019 15:06

    Earlier this year Richard Ma, the chief executive of San Francisco-based security company Quantstamp, spent $9,500 (£7,500) on a dress for his wife.

    That is a lot of money for a dress, particularly when it does not exist, at least not in a physical form.

    Instead it was a digital dress, designed by fashion house The Fabricant, rendered on to an image of Richard's wife, Mary Ren, which can then be used on social media.

    "It's definitely very expensive, but it's also like an investment," Mr Ma says.

    He explains that he and his wife don't usually buy expensive clothing, but he wanted this piece because he thinks it has long-term value.

  • RT @BBCBusiness: Could 'invisible barcodes' revolutionise recycling? ?? Link https://t.co/g5HsNo4qir
    BBC Business Fri 15 Nov 2019 14:56
  • "It is absurd... It makes me shudder that Boeing and Ethiopian Airlines are at my father's funeral and I'm not" Eight months after the Boeing 737 Max crash, unidentified remains of the victims were buried in rows of identical coffins Link https://t.co/Ly2kKvtR6T
    BBC Business Fri 15 Nov 2019 14:10

    Zipporah Kuria was fighting back tears.

    Eight months after the Boeing 737 Max crash that killed Ms Kuria's father, Joseph Waithaka, the site of impact was covered on Thursday and unidentified remains of the victims were buried in rows of identical coffins. But Ms Kuria wasn't there.

    Officials from Boeing and Ethiopian Airlines are believed to have attended a ceremony at the site, but because of the short notice Ms Kuria and other relatives of the dead were unable to attend.

    Family members of three separate victims told the BBC they were only notified of the ceremony days ago. As a result, only relatives of two of the 157 victims attended.

    "It is absurd. It makes me shudder that Boeing and Ethiopian Airlines are at my father's funeral and I'm not," Ms Kuria said.

  • Officials from Boeing and Ethiopian Airlines are believed to have attended a ceremony, but because of the short notice Zipporah Kuria and other relatives of the dead were unable to attend Link https://t.co/QBtRjfZHWs
    BBC Business Fri 15 Nov 2019 14:00

    Zipporah Kuria was fighting back tears.

    Eight months after the Boeing 737 Max crash that killed Ms Kuria's father, Joseph Waithaka, the site of impact was covered on Thursday and unidentified remains of the victims were buried in rows of identical coffins. But Ms Kuria wasn't there.

    Officials from Boeing and Ethiopian Airlines are believed to have attended a ceremony at the site, but because of the short notice Ms Kuria and other relatives of the dead were unable to attend.

    Family members of three separate victims told the BBC they were only notified of the ceremony days ago. As a result, only relatives of two of the 157 victims attended.

    "It is absurd. It makes me shudder that Boeing and Ethiopian Airlines are at my father's funeral and I'm not," Ms Kuria said.

  • The longevity industry aims to let everyone enjoy a healthy, active life well past the age of 100 - but will it happen in our lifetime? #BusinessDaily Link
    BBC Business Fri 15 Nov 2019 13:50
  • Lloyds shareholders fail in legal action over HBOS Link
    BBC Business Fri 15 Nov 2019 13:00

    A group of Lloyds shareholders have lost a multimillion-pound action against the bank over its purchase of rival HBOS in 2009.

    The 5,803 former Lloyds TSB shareholders claim they were "mugged" when the bank took over HBOS, which was laden with bad mortgages.

    Lloyds was forced to accept a £20bn state bailout and the government continued to own a stake until 2017.

    Lloyds said it welcomed the decision as the best for shareholders as a whole.

    Damon Parker, founder and partner of law firm Harcus Parker, who represents 300 institutions as well as individual shareholders in the case, said: "Our clients are deeply disappointed by today's judgment,

  • How trainers became a million dollar idea ?? Talking Business with @bbcaaron ? [Tap to expand] Link https://t.co/QK0uoZBMtq
    BBC Business Fri 15 Nov 2019 13:00

    Talking Business with Aaron Heslehurst brings you global business news, whether it's happening in the boardroom or at the grass roots. Aaron cuts through the jargon to add colour, depth and context - with live reaction from Wall Street and Asia, plus studio interviews with top CEO's and the latest innovations in technology.

    Show less
  • Air pollution in India's capital New Delhi has been off the scale this week, with schools closed and people advised to stay indoors. How are people coping with this toxic air? [Tap to expand] Link https://t.co/5pxr6DE6nf
    BBC Business Fri 15 Nov 2019 12:25
  • The Ethiopian Airlines crash site has been covered over but few victim families were able to attend Link
    BBC Business Fri 15 Nov 2019 11:45

    Zipporah Kuria was fighting back tears.

    Eight months after the Boeing 737 Max crash that killed Ms Kuria's father, Joseph Waithaka, the site of impact was covered on Thursday and unidentified remains of the victims were buried in rows of identical coffins. But Ms Kuria wasn't there.

    Officials from Boeing and Ethiopian Airlines are believed to have attended a ceremony at the site, but because of the short notice Ms Kuria and other relatives of the dead were unable to attend.

    Family members of three separate victims told the BBC they were only notified of the ceremony days ago. As a result, only relatives of two of the 157 victims attended.

    "It is absurd. It makes me shudder that Boeing and Ethiopian Airlines are at my father's funeral and I'm not," Ms Kuria said.

  • RT @BBC_Teach: In our NEW PSHE series, @stephbreakfast breaks down some key areas of study on the topic of financial literacy. These four…
    BBC Business Fri 15 Nov 2019 11:30
  • RT @ManuelaBBC: The longevity industry treats the process of ageing as a medical condition and reckons that soon it'll be normal to expect…
    BBC Business Fri 15 Nov 2019 11:30
  • Fashion collections that only exist in digital form are being sold, as the fashion industry learns from computer games ? Link
    BBC Business Fri 15 Nov 2019 11:10

    Earlier this year Richard Ma, the chief executive of San Francisco-based security company Quantstamp, spent $9,500 (£7,500) on a dress for his wife.

    That is a lot of money for a dress, particularly when it does not exist, at least not in a physical form.

    Instead it was a digital dress, designed by fashion house The Fabricant, rendered on to an image of Richard's wife, Mary Ren, which can then be used on social media.

    "It's definitely very expensive, but it's also like an investment," Mr Ma says.

    He explains that he and his wife don't usually buy expensive clothing, but he wanted this piece because he thinks it has long-term value.

S&P500
VIX
Eurostoxx50
FTSE100
Nikkei 225
TNX (UST10y)
EURUSD
GBPUSD
USDJPY
BTCUSD
Gold spot
Brent
Copper
Last update . Delayed by 15 mins. Prices from Yahoo!