• Gender balance should be framed as a business issue — not a dimension of diversity. Link
    Harvard Business Review Fri 15 Nov 2019 19:01

    Getting men to embrace gender balance requires leaders skilled at making the link between balance and business. When leaders buy it, and are skilled at selling it, everyone gets on board. The author offers three steps to accelerate towards better balance. For one, don’t call men “champions” or “allies.” Engaging men isn’t about getting women to become ever more congratulatory about men who “get it.” Two, make gender balance a business issue. Until leaders really are convinced that gender balance is a strategic lever for the business, and become authentically and articulately convincing to their colleagues about why that is, balance remains a politically correct sideline. And finally, make gender balance personal, measurable, and accountable.

  • Don’t miss a single article. Subscribe to HBR now and unlock access to all of the latest digital content on Link. Link https://t.co/A7i5cWQx3B
    Harvard Business Review Fri 15 Nov 2019 18:41
  • RT @kapsar: This is a really interesting article about code-switching. Everyone should read this, but I think it's really important for whi…
    Harvard Business Review Fri 15 Nov 2019 18:41
  • Join the 11th @GDruckerForum virtually though a livestream November 21-22. Receive 20% off by registering with code HBR-LS. More details and registration here: #GPDF19 Link https://t.co/tqac91EehS
    Harvard Business Review Fri 15 Nov 2019 18:31
  • [SPONSORED] “How to Empower and Engage Your Workforce by Focusing on the Employee Experience” by @salesforce and @deloittetalent #ConnectMe: Link
    Harvard Business Review Fri 15 Nov 2019 18:01
  • Most executives don't realize how bad their frontline jobs really are. Link
    Harvard Business Review Fri 15 Nov 2019 18:01

    One-third of American workers are in jobs for which the median wage is below $15 an hour (or $31,200 a year at 40 hours a week). More than half of retail and food service workers get less than a week’s notice of their schedule. Yet the authors’ extensive experience with top executives has shown us that many genuinely believe they are doing everything they can for their frontline workers and therefore don’t have a bad jobs problem. But they aren’t and they do. How can these data-driven business leaders be so misinformed? This article explores why.

  • RT @CL_McCluney: So proud of my coauthors @DrDurkee @Richsm18 Kathrina Robotham @um_psychology & Serenity Lee @HarvardHBS for our first pub…
    Harvard Business Review Fri 15 Nov 2019 17:41
  • Black workers code-switch because they have to. How can we create a workplace where they can thrive while being themselves? Link
    Harvard Business Review Fri 15 Nov 2019 17:26

    At this point in my career, code-switching feels natural. I am not even cognizant that I do it anymore. —30-year-old black male researcher

    In 2012, a video of President Barack Obama entering the locker room of the U.S. men’s Olympic basketball team went viral. In the clip, viewers can see that there’s a clear difference between how Obama greets a white assistant coach and how he greets the black NBA player Kevin Durant. This moment inspired a sketch on Key & Peele in 2014 that played off the idea that Obama “switches” how he greets people, depending on whether they’re white or black.

    This kind of behavioral adjustment is casually referred to as “code-switching,” which has long been a strategy for black people to successfully navigate interracial interactions and has large implications for their well-being, economic advancement, and even physical survival.

    Broadly, code-switching involves adjusting one’s style of speech, appearance, behavior,...

  • African-Americans still face far too many obstacles that white professionals don’t. And leaders aren’t doing enough to support them. Link
    Harvard Business Review Fri 15 Nov 2019 17:01

    “Happy elephant success is to be measured not so much by the position that one has reached in life as by the obstacles which [one] has overcome while trying to succeed.”

    “Success is to be measured not so much by the position that one has reached in life as by the obstacles which [one] has overcome while trying to succeed.”

    Booker T. Washington, the educator, author, activist, and presidential adviser, wrote those words more than a century ago as a way of encouraging his African-American compatriots — many of them recently emancipated from slavery — to persist in the fight for equal rights and economic opportunities. He was proud of what he and his peers had achieved. He surely believed there was satisfaction in struggling against and surmounting bad odds. And yet we must also assume that he, along with millions of other freedom fighters, wanted future generations of black Americans to suffer fewer hardships. He hoped today’s black leaders...

  • How to identify what you're passionate about and use it as fuel for a career change. Link
    Harvard Business Review Fri 15 Nov 2019 16:51
  • RT @Erica_Keswin: @HarvardBiz "Seeking to avoid stereotypes is hard work, & can deplete cognitive resources & hinder performance. Feigning…
    Harvard Business Review Fri 15 Nov 2019 16:51
  • We’d like your feedback on a potential headline for an upcoming special issue of HBR. Click on the link below to take our very short survey: Link
    Harvard Business Review Fri 15 Nov 2019 15:41
  • Black workers modify their behaviors, appearances, and expressions to fit into white workplaces. It’s coming at a high psychological cost. Link
    Harvard Business Review Fri 15 Nov 2019 15:11

    At this point in my career, code-switching feels natural. I am not even cognizant that I do it anymore. —30-year-old black male researcher

    In 2012, a video of President Barack Obama entering the locker room of the U.S. men’s Olympic basketball team went viral. In the clip, viewers can see that there’s a clear difference between how Obama greets a white assistant coach and how he greets the black NBA player Kevin Durant. This moment inspired a sketch on Key & Peele in 2014 that played off the idea that Obama “switches” how he greets people, depending on whether they’re white or black.

    This kind of behavioral adjustment is casually referred to as “code-switching,” which has long been a strategy for black people to successfully navigate interracial interactions and has large implications for their well-being, economic advancement, and even physical survival.

    Broadly, code-switching involves adjusting one’s style of speech, appearance, behavior,...

  • If you think agile is just for project managers and innovation teams, think again. Agile is expanding its reach. Learn more about this important topic with Agile: The Insights You Need from Harvard Business Review. Link
    Harvard Business Review Fri 15 Nov 2019 14:46
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  • RT @lettyel: Do you allocate time for work that is important but not urgent? Do you encourage your teams to do so? Link
    Harvard Business Review Fri 15 Nov 2019 14:35

    You can add location information to your Tweets, such as your city or precise location, from the web and via third-party applications. You always have the option to delete your Tweet location history. Learn more

  • Creating the right ecosystem for innovation can prepare businesses to respond to a competitive, ever-changing environment. Link
    Harvard Business Review Fri 15 Nov 2019 14:20

    To ensure their companies stay innovative, leaders need to create an ecosystem that allows winning ideas to consistently emerge. In two decades of strategy consulting and research, the authors have learned that building such an ecosystem requires developing capabilities for exploring new ideas, experimentation, accepting failure, and working with external partners.

  • When we're busy, we tend to focus on urgent tasks — which usually end up being less important. Link
    Harvard Business Review Fri 15 Nov 2019 13:45

    When it comes to our to-do lists, many of us prioritize checking off tasks that are easiest to complete or are due first, regardless of importance – a phenomenon that scholars describe as the “mere urgency” effect. This tendency becomes stronger the busier we are. But constantly prioritizing urgent tasks means that important tasks that have no urgent deadline (such as updating your resume or doing creative work) get pushed aside for later and later. Some just never get done. When we fail to do what’s important, often what matters most to us, we feel stressed, overwhelmed, and unmotivated— and firms are less productive. Research suggests managers can help employees combat the tendency to put off for tomorrow what isn’t due today: have employees set aside proactive time for work that is important but not urgent.

  • Superstar firms tend to make big investments in intangible assets — which lead companies to mark up their products. Link
    Harvard Business Review Fri 15 Nov 2019 13:15

    In two new studies, researchers find signs of a weakening competitive environment for a large number of countries using two distinct measures: firm markups and industry concentration. These studies suggest that the trends first observed in the U.S. are part of a broader phenomenon, likely caused by factors that are common to many developed economies. The jury is still out on the relative importance of M&As, intangibles, and digitization, together with other factors such as globalization and anti-competitive regulations. For firms, however, the message is clear: this is a superstars’ economy, and the scope for being average is becoming increasingly narrow.

  • RT @molmar: "The imperative should be creating a context in which people of all colors can realize their full potential. This will involve…
    Harvard Business Review Fri 15 Nov 2019 12:40
  • Companies shouldn't accommodate their employees with disabilities only to be compliant. They should also recognize the value they can bring. Link
    Harvard Business Review Fri 15 Nov 2019 12:05

    Professionals with disabilities are a larger and more valuable population than many business leaders realize. In our study, we found that 30% of white-collar employees meet the federal government’s definition of having a disability. Companies reap rewards when they signal that they are a rare organization offering a culture that supports this talent cohort. They know that ADA compliance is just a tiny step in the direction of all the gains to be made from fully including both consumers–and employees–with disabilities. So how do you capture the innovation that comes from including your consumers—and employees– with disabilities in your business? There are three ways. First, recognize the innovative potential of employees with disabilities. Then, create inclusive environments that empower professionals with disabilities. Finally, expand your definition of innovation so that you’re not just innovating for edge cases.

  • As one of the most historically oppressed groups in the United States, African-Americans bring resilience, a robust sense of self, and a growth mindset to the table. It’s time for leaders to acknowledge their value. #AdvancingBlackLeaders Link
    Harvard Business Review Fri 15 Nov 2019 11:25

    “Happy elephant success is to be measured not so much by the position that one has reached in life as by the obstacles which [one] has overcome while trying to succeed.”

    “Success is to be measured not so much by the position that one has reached in life as by the obstacles which [one] has overcome while trying to succeed.”

    Booker T. Washington, the educator, author, activist, and presidential adviser, wrote those words more than a century ago as a way of encouraging his African-American compatriots — many of them recently emancipated from slavery — to persist in the fight for equal rights and economic opportunities. He was proud of what he and his peers had achieved. He surely believed there was satisfaction in struggling against and surmounting bad odds. And yet we must also assume that he, along with millions of other freedom fighters, wanted future generations of black Americans to suffer fewer hardships. He hoped today’s black leaders...

  • When victims take discrimination issues to court and win, it does lead to change at their companies. But mostly when shareholders and national media also take notice. Link
    Harvard Business Review Fri 15 Nov 2019 10:35

    When companies face lawsuits over gender or racial discrimination, does change follow? Researchers looked at 171 lawsuits that occurred between 1997 and 2008 to study how litigation affected the managerial diversity of the companies involved. Overall, results showed, a discrimination lawsuit led to measurable gains in representation for black women, black men, and white women. However, the outcomes were influenced by media coverage, whether and how policy changes were mandated, and how large payouts were. The authors caution that although litigation can be an effective tool for fighting harassment, lawsuits alone aren’t enough to make changes stick.

  • Tech companies are dealing with what happens when ethics gets in the way of making money. Link
    Harvard Business Review Fri 15 Nov 2019 09:20

    The central challenge ethics owners in tech companies are grappling with is negotiating between external pressures to respond to ethical crises at the same time that they must be responsive to the internal processes of their companies and the industry. On the one hand, external criticisms push them toward challenging core business practices and priorities. On the other hand, there are pressures to establish or restore predictable processes and outcomes that serve the bottom line. This ratchets up the pressure to fit in and ratchets down the capacity to object to ethically questionable products, which makes it all the more difficult to distinguish between success and failure — moral victories can look like punishment while ethically questionable products earn big bonuses. The tensions that arise from this must be worked through, with one eye on process, but also with the other eye squarely focused on outcomes for the broader society.

  • As you acquire more power, people are more likely to want to please you by listening more attentively, agreeing more, and laughing at your jokes. All of these things tickle the ego. Link
    Harvard Business Review Fri 15 Nov 2019 08:55

    The inflated ego that comes with success – the bigger salary, the nicer office, the easy laughs – often makes us feel as if we’ve found the eternal answer to being a leader. But the reality is, we haven’t. An inflated ego makes us susceptible to manipulation; it narrows our field of vision; and it corrupts our behavior, often causing us to act against our values. Breaking free of an overly-protective or inflated ego and avoiding the leadership bubble is an important and challenging job that requires selflessness, reflection, and courage.

  • If more African-Americans are to rise through the ranks, robust and careful investment in retention and development is required. @alignmentquest Link
    Harvard Business Review Fri 15 Nov 2019 07:40

    “Happy elephant success is to be measured not so much by the position that one has reached in life as by the obstacles which [one] has overcome while trying to succeed.”

    “Success is to be measured not so much by the position that one has reached in life as by the obstacles which [one] has overcome while trying to succeed.”

    Booker T. Washington, the educator, author, activist, and presidential adviser, wrote those words more than a century ago as a way of encouraging his African-American compatriots — many of them recently emancipated from slavery — to persist in the fight for equal rights and economic opportunities. He was proud of what he and his peers had achieved. He surely believed there was satisfaction in struggling against and surmounting bad odds. And yet we must also assume that he, along with millions of other freedom fighters, wanted future generations of black Americans to suffer fewer hardships. He hoped today’s black leaders...

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